Brewing RIGHT

Brewing Iced Coffee

peets-cold-brew-coffee

To Make: Combine 12 ounces (1½ heaping cups) medium to coarsely ground coffee with 4 cups room-temperature water in a glass container. Let sit at room temperature for 12 hours. Strain through a mesh strainer lined with a coffee filter. (This base, about 2¾ cups total, will keep in the refrigerator for 2 weeks.)

To serve: Combine a scant 1/2 cup of the coffee base with equal parts water or milk. Pour over ice. Makes 6 servings.

Brewing Tea

o-ICED-TEA-facebook.jpg

  • To make a tea stronger, don’t steep it for longer. Unless it’s an herbal, steeping a tea for too long will make it bitter rather than strong. Instead, add more tea leaves or bags!
  • As a general rule, use one level teaspoon or 2 grams for every cup (8 oz) you’re making. Fluffier ingredients like mint and chamomile, or teas with larger leaves like green tea or oolong could use an extra teaspoon.
  • Tea bag teas are usually one per cup (8 oz) of tea, though you can always double-up when you want it stronger!
  • Spring water is ideal for brewing, but not necessary for making a good cup of tea. If possible, use fresh cold water. Never use water from the hot water tap. Let the tap water run for a few seconds until it is quite cold; this ensures that the water is aerated (full of oxygen) to release the full flavor of the tea leaves.
  • Try not to let your water reach a rolling boil, as that will release oxygen and result in a flat-tasting cup of tea.
  • If brewing with loose leaf tea, there are several different types of infusers available; sometimes you’ll need to experiment a little until you find the perfect one for you.
  • Many teas are good for a second (even third!) steeping. Multiple steepings can bring out more subtle flavors and notes. Commonly, oolong, green tea, white tea and pu-erh fall into this category. Give it a shot—you might end up liking the second infusion better than the first!

If a tea doesn’t taste quite right the first time around, experiment with changing the steeping time, water temperature, and tea amount until you find the flavor you enjoy.

French Press

hkgetdsbsmtsika58hwv

Grind and measure
Use coarse ground coffee that resembles sea salt in your press, and measure 2 tablespoons per 6 ounces of water.

TIP: Remember, coffee is like produce. Buy it often in small quantities to enjoy it at the peak of freshness.
Add hot water
Fill the press with hot water that’s just off the boil. Make sure to saturate all the grounds.

TIP: To give your coffee the best possible flavor, use filtered or bottled water.
Place plunger and brew
Put the plunger back on the press without pushing it down, and let the coffee brew for 4 minutes.

Pour Over

20140619-pourover-wire

Measure and grind
Next, measure your coffee. For pour-over, use coffee ground for a paper cone. It’s a relatively fine grind that looks like granulated sugar. Measure 2 tablespoons of coffee per 6 ounces of water.

Pour and pause
Use hot water that’s just off the boil and fill the cone halfway to saturate the grounds. Pause for 10 seconds and let the coffee bloom. This allows the coffee to hydrate evenly and begin to develop flavor.

Complete the pour and enjoy
Slowly add the rest of the water, pouring in small, steady circles to cover all the grounds. Enjoy immediately.

TIP: To make your pour-over more consistent, use a timer. It should take about 3 minutes to make a cup.

Coffee Brewer

466

Choose the right grind
For a flat bottom filter, use a medium grind that resembles sea salt. Cone filters use a finer grind that resembles granulated sugar.

Measure
Use 2 tablespoons of freshly ground coffee for every 6 ounces of water.

Brew and enjoy
TIP: Brewed coffee is always best fresh, so make as much as you’ll enjoy in a sitting. Reheating coffee can dull the flavor.

Advertisements